VERY CHEAP POCKET BIKES : POCKET BIKES


VERY CHEAP POCKET BIKES : WATER BICYCLES.



Very Cheap Pocket Bikes





very cheap pocket bikes






    pocket bikes
  • A minibike, sometimes called a mini moto or pocketbike, is a miniature motorcycle. Most traditional minibikes use a two stroke engine to turn the rear wheel via a chain.





    cheap
  • bum: of very poor quality; flimsy

  • (of prices or other charges) Low

  • (of an item for sale) Low in price; worth more than its cost

  • brassy: tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"

  • Charging low prices

  • relatively low in price or charging low prices; "it would have been cheap at twice the price"; "inexpensive family restaurants"











very cheap pocket bikes - Garmin eTrex




Garmin eTrex Waterproof Hiking GPS


Garmin eTrex Waterproof Hiking GPS



All the power of a 12 parallel channel GPS receiver in a palm-sized package / Waterproof / Stores up to 500 waypoints All five buttons are placed on the sides, for simple, one-handed operation that doesn't obstruct your view of the display Bright yellow case makes it easy to locate in the boat or backpack And the eTrex is waterproof, so a splash or dunk is not a watery grave for the eTrex The high-performance, GPS receiver runs 18 hours on two AA batteries Even under canopy forest conditons, the eTrex maintains a tight satellite lock Stores up to 500 waypoints with graphic icons Exclusive TracBack feature provides a reverse course home

A few years ago, when personal GPSs first became available, every geek from here to Poughkeepsie was enthralled about the possibility of always knowing exactly where on the planet he or she was. While the Garmin eTrex isn't the most feature-rich GPS out there, it will definitely come in handy if you don't want your next camping trip to end up like a scene from The Blair Witch Project.


The eTrex allows you to pack more detail into your adventure with added color, expandable memory, and automatic routing capabilities.

The eTrex is sort of a dumbed-down, rugged version of the company's more advanced eMap. Designed specifically for hiking, biking, and camping, the eTrex is one of the easiest-to-use GPS units available. It offers the ability to track up to 12 satellites so you never lose contact with one. The eTrex won't work inside--however, we don't anticipate that you'll get lost inside a building very often.
Among the eTrex's notable features is its ability to calculate your current and average speed. We used the eTrex to determine the distance from work to home, and to calculate how fast we were walking. This helped us gauge the average time it should take to get to work. This feature should really come in handy on extended hiking, camping, or cycling trips where planning your average speed and tracking the distance traveled is critical.
Sticking with its theme of simplicity, the eTrex has only five buttons, making it easy to use with just one hand (It's specifically designed for the left hand.) Weighing only 5.3 ounces with the batteries installed, the eTrex is also ultralight, making it an easy addition to a daypack. The eTrex is also waterproof, so a little water shouldn't damage the unit.


Turn-by-turn directions make long trips a snap.

Check your speed, ETA, and distance.

Great for calculating distance and directions for camping trips.

Get predictions for when it's best to hunt and fish.

The eTrex can hold up to 500 user-created waypoints. And using Garmin's TracBack feature, it's easy to plot a course with up to 10 waypoints and follow it in both directions. --Julian Strate
Pros:
Easy to use
Light
Waterproof
Cons:
Batteries only last about 20 hours

A few years ago, when personal GPSs first became available, every geek from here to Poughkeepsie was enthralled about the possibility of always knowing exactly where on the planet he or she was. While the Garmin eTrex isn't the most feature-rich GPS out there, it will definitely come in handy if you don't want your next camping trip to end up like a scene from The Blair Witch Project.
The eTrex is sort of a dumbed-down, rugged version of the company's more advanced eMap. Designed specifically for hiking, biking, and camping, the eTrex is one of the easiest-to-use GPS units available. It offers the ability to track up to 12 satellites so you never lose contact with one. The eTrex won't work inside--however, we don't anticipate that you'll get lost inside a building very often.
Among the eTrex's notable features is its ability to calculate your current and average speed. We used the eTrex to determine the distance from work to home, and to calculate how fast we were walking. This helped us gauge the average time it should take to get to work. This feature should really come in handy on extended hiking, camping, or cycling trips where planning your average speed and tracking the distance traveled is critical.

Main menu
Map page
Pointer page
Mark pointer page


Sticking with its theme of simplicity, the eTrex has only five buttons, making it easy to use with just one hand (It's specifically designed for the left hand.) Weighing only 5.3 ounces with the batteries installed, the eTrex is also ultralight, making it an easy addition to a daypack. The eTrex is also waterproof, so a little water shouldn't damage the unit.
The eTrex can hold up to 500 user-created waypoints. And using Garmin's TracBack feature, it's easy to plot a course with up to 10 waypoints and follow it in both directions. --Julian Strate
Pros:
Easy to use
Light
Waterproof
Cons:
Batteries only last about 20 hours

The Garmin eTrex GPS is a remarkable GPS in a small, compact package. The eTrext takes the best features of a 12-paralle channel GPS receiver and puts them into a six-ounce, handheld device that is only four inches high and a mere two inches wide. The result is a powerful machine in the palm of your hand.

Map page.
View larger.

Mark waypoint. View larger.

The Garmin eTrex is a simple, compact GPS device. View larger.
Besides its small size, boaters and outdoorsmen will be happy with the eTrex's unique button layout design. All the buttons are located on either side of the unit. The benefits of this design are two-fold. First, the eTrex is a breeze to operate with just one hand and, second, with the buttons on both sides of the unit the bulk of the front of the device is dedicated to the large, LCD display with backlight. The eTrex is so simple it only sports five buttons -- Page, Power, Up, Down, and Enter. Thanks to the its bright yellow case, the eTrex is easy to spot and hard to misplace in a boat, backpack, or trunk. Garmin also designed this tiny GPS to be completely waterproof so it can handle an accidental splash or dunk and continue to perform.
Locked away behind the waterproof protection, you will find the proven performance of a 12 parallel channel GPS receiver that will run for up to 22 hours on just two AA batteries. The antenna is also internal and the external power and data connector are protected as well. In addition to determining your location, the eTrex creates, names, and saves a location as an electronic waypoint in its memory -- up to 500 individual waypoints. This allows you to navigate back to this point any time you want, from any location or, with Garmin's TracBack feature, you can reverse your track log and navigate your way back home. And once you start moving, the GPS provides other data, like speed, direction of movement, time and distance to destination, and more.
In addition to these basic features, the eTrex provides one more critical benefit; peace of mind, because with GPS you know where you are, where you've been, and where you are going. And since you always know your way back home, you can concentrate on enjoy yourself outdoors, on the water, or wherever your travels may take you.

What's in the Box
eTrex GPS receiver, wrist strap, user's guide, and quick reference guide.










82% (8)





IMG00400-20110925-1257




IMG00400-20110925-1257





[BB9550]

I thought this one might come out at least halfway-decent but no.

Now I shot these at 12:30 local-time. Wasn't like the sun was just above the treeline. Though it was a bright day, I was somewhere between shades and a cap, sitting there before taking these pictures. But in that sense the foreground was well-lit, yes?

I didn't actually shoot *this* shot with film, because there was a guy sitting on the bank across the river and kids that ran down into my shot when I was on the far side taking some shots and they were still there. But with the BB9550 it was either this or nothing and I wasn't into walking around the lake today. I just wanted a few quick wide-angle landscape shots with this sort of cloud-cover to burn out the roll of film I had in the N80 and I had to come back to take these as I forgot all about taking shots with my cellphone for comparison. But it was obvious that they weren't going to look good. "Instant replay" doesn't exactly tell you that you have a great shot but it will tell you with confidence that you have a bad exposure LOL

Visual confirmation that the AE sucks doesn't really help, though, does it?
Just think about it: how useful is such information while you are there at the scene...if you can't do anything about it? If anything this is why BB is losing 50% of its revenues each quarter. They came up with the *idea* of the smartphone that can take photos...and that's about it.

Anyway, yeah: this lesson I learned from shooting film. But at least with film I could have gotten a decent shot here. This is the worst part about shooting jpegs from a digital camera combined with the worst sort of digital camera that you can get: a 1/3" diagonal high-res cellphone with exposure-bias fixed in software. Even with my 5 year-old V3i I could change the exposure-bias. And yes while lowering the exposure would have made the foreground even darker, at least I could have taken multiple shots at different exposures and blended them, which is what HDR is all about. And later on as the weather cleared up and the sky got more blue I had the same problem. It isn't just overcast or mostly-cloudy days that the BB9550 has problems with, it's any real high-dynamic-range scene. This is just an extreme case, the result is a "black & white" shot, but unless the overall scene DR is low enough the result will just be a low-contrast shot with large parts of it blown-out. The scene has to have well under 4 stops of DR, say 10% to 90% on the histogram, before it will come out ok on the BB9550, and that's not because the exposure-bias can't be adjusted, it's because the camera has very-limited DR.

But even at the highest IQ setting the biggest shot it's given me is about 1200kB, while on average they are about 500kB. That's a good 1000-1500 shots even with a 1GB SD card. Even today, having the N80 and Tokina lens in my bag when I wanted to take a decent field-shot, I had to use the BB9550 because I didn't have any film for the camera. And of course the results looked like crap because of this very-same limited DR issue. Blue skies with puffy white clouds, well-lit "foresty" foreground but with a ratio of about 5:1 foreground to sky...I just gave up on it after two shots. The foreground was there but low in contrast and the sky was completely blown-out. Even framing the shot so that the ratio was about 2:1 didn't fix the problem. It seems that the camera can tolerate one histogram-peak, but not two. And I realized that if I'm going to go out shooting even just on the occasional weekend, I have to bring a real camera. The BB9550 is just not good enough for that one simple reason. It makes film, with its attendant issues, still look pretty good. Despite all those attendant issues. If only for weekend excursions. If only for the occasional "snap" on a well-lit day.

I'm telling ya: $2/roll for 24 exposures and 5 rolls for a day of shooting, even shooting 2 & 3-shot brackets, $10 for development and cutting of all 5 rolls at CVS. $20 for 100 shots. That's a lot cheaper than a $500 DSLR. You may say, "not when you take thousands of shots, and factor in the time it takes to get it developed, cut, scanned and post-processed". Sure, but you're the fool who is taking thousands of shots. The break-even here is 2500 shots. At a non-testing, "I know what I'm doing" rate, that's a years' worth of shooting going out and shooting 2 rolls every weekend. Going out and shooting 2 rolls once a month every month, that's 4 years. Even if you switch to some exotic $8/roll film that's still a years' worth of film, shooting at that rate. I don't know about you, but to me 2500 "real" shots a year is a lot of shots. How many years are you going to produce "real" shots at that rate? Are you saying that in 5 years you'll have justified buying a $2500 DSLR? Using that logic over the past 5 years you would have happily bought what, a 5D











Georgetown Waterfront, yet another try




Georgetown Waterfront, yet another try





G9 handheld ISO200 1/13s F2.8 about 50mm effective.
Dcraw> jpeg > Gimp with rotation, crop & mild usm with a moderate threshold.

I haven't even pushed this. It's much sharper and virtually realistic with a stronger USM but of course slightly more noisy depending on how hard you hit it (I prefer to use a lower threshold as the noise remains random, but that's a personal decision).

I have slightly more-stable versions of the ~100 or so attempts that I made while the sun was setting.

{...in fact I'm at the point now where I am weeding-through tens of thousands of various post-processing edits of my shots and going back and redoing them all either from the initial jpeg after raw conversion or the original raw file, trying to both cut down on wasted space (I just nuked about 100GB of image data over the past 2 weeks) and combine all my PP skills in one edit. Trying to deal with the 8-bit vs 16-bit issue in the process. Looks like a laptop upgrade is in order, and then I have dozens, hundreds of sorted directories of image to process. Before I take another goddam picture :)

It's probably not going to happen that way, undoubtedly I'll buy another camera or two, shoot it somewhere that I've taken shots before, and work from there. I already have the ones below in mind, and the question is which one will I *not* buy... and what will I add to the list below...but for crissakes I'm definitely buying another camera beyond this G9 (as much as I like it) because it's just too slow and noisy for comfortable handheld shooting in twilight. I can do it but only so good and so far into the twilight. And in life we either move forward or die.

Then I have to figure out how I want to display the results.

Is a 2MP 17" diagonal LCD display the best combination of IQ and practicality that I can find? It's certainly portable...which is important to a degree. I can get a 3MP 21"+ LCD but that's not a significant upgrade and it's still 8-bit color. So I end-up shooting a 14MP 12bit+ camera in raw, not to mention in panos, working in 16-bit color on a 64-bit laptop and displaying the results in 8-bit color on a 2MP laptop LCD? Somehow that doesn't seem right. But is the answer a low-resolution P&S with a fast, wide IS lens? That's just trading crabapples for tangerines. The main problem is that the Japanese will happily sell 45" displays that are no more advanced, IQ-wise, than my 5 year old laptop display. To justify working in a real image-format I need a real monitor which means that I need real video that can fully support the image-format (or at least, can support it well). I am not going to resort to a 16-bit printer.}

So here's the conundrum.
Keep the G9 when it can produce a shot like this handheld.
Adequate FOV? check.
Adequate noise for a given exposure at 17" diagonal? check.
Adequate speed, likewise? check.
...decent sharpness across the frame at wide open? Check.

Maybe a little more DR but a gamma-push and then more contrast would take care of that. Certainly processing the raw file directly to final would help there too [btw Gimp can only handle 8-bit image data so it would immediately lower the color resolution, to pursue this further I'd have to find a Linux app that can work in 16-bit but in the end it would still have to come out in 8bit jpeg. All images end up in jpeg sooner or later.].

Or...
get another, faster, cleaner camera that can shoot raw...
LX3:
G10:
G11:
A fullframe & Tamron 28-300:
A tripod, for this one scene, and anything else that is interesting within walking distance, and shoot it again at F4 ISO80.

...you make the call.

But first you have to answer the basic questions.

1: how much cleaner is a 10MP 1/1.6" sensor at ISO200 than a 12MP or even at 15MP 1/1.6" sensor?

2: just how fast and sharp across the frame is the lens on a LX3, G10, G11 and the Tamron 28-300VC on a fullframe, at 50mm effective at wide-open?

and last but not least:

3: how much cleaner is the G9 at ISO80 compared to ISO200 at the same exposure?

The last one I know: you can't really see shadow-noise in an ISO80 G9 shot at this exposure-level, at full-image on a 17" display. But the same goes for the noise at ISO200 also. It only comes out with a strong USM or exposure-push. I know from DxOmark that the 10MP sensors are maybe 1/2stop cleaner in terms of SNR than the 12MP G9 sensor and even the 15MP G10 sensor, but the latter have finer noise-grain which makes the noise harder to see on a print. It's easier to see on a *display* because the display is downsampling the image. Dramatically. And making the noise less uniform in the process. And clearly the noise here isn't high enough to be concerned with on a display, if anything I would be worried about it on a large print with "adequate" sharpening.

Last but not least, I'd have to say that over halfway through its focal-length range the LX3 is at F2.8, the G10-G11 are close to F2.8, and the Tamron 2









very cheap pocket bikes








very cheap pocket bikes




Carry Case for TomTom and Garmin GPS Navigators






Protect your portable GPS to against bumps, dings and scratches. Fits most GPS with 3.5" and 4.3" screen. The durable straps will keep your GPS secure in the soft interior lining. One mesh pocket to organize accessories. Inner dimensions: 5" X 3 3/4" X 1.5". -Compatibility: Garmin nuvi 200, 300, 500, 600, 700, 800 series -TomTom One 2nd, 3rd Edition, One XL, XLS, TomTom 520, 720, 920, 530, 730, 930, TomTom One 125, 130, 130*S, 330, 330*S -Mio DigiWalker C310, 710, 320, 520, 720, 200 series, 300 series










See also:

4 seat bicycle

fixie bike store

salt creek bike path

oakley bike shorts

fold up bikes for sale

dirt bike party invitations

scott bike frames

schwinn broadway hybrid bike

thule trunk bike rack



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